Marius Hauknes

Collegiate Assistant Professor, Humanities

Marius B. Hauknes is an art historian whose research addresses the intersection of medieval art, science, and theology. His current book project, The Image of the World in Thirteenth Century Rome, examines encyclopedic wall paintings sponsored by the papacy in relation to the profound changes in the period’s theories of knowledge. Other research interests include medieval cave painting and rock art; historiography of medieval art; and the instrumentality of visual artifacts in medieval astrology and medicine. 

Hauknes received his Ph.D. in art history from Princeton University in 2014, and holds a BA and MA from the University of Oslo, Norway. From 2014 to 2016 he held the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, where he taught courses in medieval art in the Department of History of Art. During his doctoral studies he held a Twenty-Four-Month Chester Dale Fellowship from the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and spent a year as a Princeton Fellow at the Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Rome. 

Publications include “Emblematic Narratives in the Sancta Sanctorum,” Studies in Iconography, 34 (2013), 1-46; and “The Painting of Knowledge in Thirteenth-Century Rome,” Gesta, 55, no. 1 (Spring 2016), 19-47. 

CV